The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

Middle Birth: The second Rings movie carries the torch lit by its predecessor.

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

Directed by Peter Jackson

Written by Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Stephen Sinclair & Peter Jackson
based on the novel by J.R.R. Tolkien

Starring Elijah Wood, Ian McKellen, Viggo Mortensen, Sean Astin




The second installment of the Rings trilogy picks up exactly where The
Fellowship of the Ring
left off. No introduction. No voiceover catch-up.
The hobbits Frodo and Sam have struck out on their own, trying to reach Mount
Doom deep inside Mordor to destroy the ring of power, entrusted to Frodo by
his uncle, Bilbo. The threatening Gollum is hot on their heels, and seems to
have bad things on his mind. Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli are in pursuit of a
band of bloodthirsty, mutant orcs who have abducted the other two hobbits, Merry
and Pippin. The power granted to the evil Saruman by the really evil Sauron
is growing, and one by one the peaceful kingdoms are falling to his hordes of
orcs. Gandalf is presumed lost after falling in battle with the demon Balrog
in the previous film.



The Lord of the Rings trilogy is the most costly film production ever
undertaken due to Jackson’s insistence that all three installments be shot as
a single, monstrous endeavor. Two-thirds through delivery, it’s clear that the
adaptation could not have succeeded otherwise. Strictly speaking, The Two
Towers
isn’t a sequel – it’s part two of three. (The original epic by J.R.R.
Tolkien was divided into three books by the publisher, not the author.) By shooting
the entire series in one extended sitting, Jackson avoided the continuity problems
that undermine similar franchises. The Harry Potter series, for instance. The
actors haven’t aged significantly, and there are no scheduling conflicts or
deaths that cause roles to be re-cast. The director, cinematographer, screenwriters
and art director will be the same throughout, thus avoiding aesthetic and tonal
incongruities between the films.



That’s not to say that the films are without flaws. Like the original books,
the first two adaptations are dense, plodding and often obtuse – the work of
an Oxford linguistics professor – and one can reasonably assume that the third
film, due in one year, will follow suit. The Fellowship of the Ring,
was saddled with an overwhelming number of characters and histories and plotlines;
The Two Towers shoulders the responsibility of bringing them all together.
Those not familiar with the books were a bit lost in the first movie, and they
may be bored by the second.



It’s tempting to say that reviews of The Fellowship of the Ring could
stand in for reviews of the second, but that’s not quite true. This is a bloodier
film, and even though orcs suffer most of the indignities in the battle scenes,
there’s a fair share of dead humans and elves. To his credit, Jackson is unapologetic.
He’s not afraid to kill the good guys, sometimes in nasty fashion. Recall the
murder in Beautiful Creatures, one of Jackson’s previous films. Now imagine
that disturbing ten-second scene expanded to five-, ten- and sixty-minute engagements
between infantry, cavalry and archers. The action is stunning.



Good thing, too, because just about every bit of tension and suspense in
The Two Towers
is derived from violence. The last hour is filled with bloodshed,
and one needn’t be a historian to see the metaphor in the climactic battle scene,
in which an alliance between elves and humans defend the Rohan nation in the
isolated, island-like stronghold of Helm’s Deep. As Salman Rushdie pointed out
in The Guardian earlier this month, Tolkien dismissed analogies between Sauron
and the Nazi war machine, but more than sixty years later, it’s ridiculous to
allow Tolkien this protest. The allegory comes through, accidental or not, and
is particularly striking now.



Like a certain other trilogy-based franchise, The Two Towers has a major
flaw in the form of an annoying animated character. At the end of The Fellowship
of the Ring
, Gollum was offered up as a teaser and audiences were juiced
to see one of fantasy-lit’s most-loved characters come to life. Tolkien’s original
Gollum is creepy and conniving, a fallen everyman. Gollum is the walking despair
of addiction, his thirst to once again hold the ring of power trampling any
compassion that may still exist deep inside his soul.



In Towers, Gollum is Jar Jar Binks after spending a few years living
in a squat strung out on heroin. His schizophrenic monologues are long distractions,
doing little to explain and expand the conflict that Tolkien’s original character
embodied. Even though a flesh-and-blood actor originally performed Gollum’s
role – presumably against a screen on a New Zealand soundstage – the digital
exaggerations make Gollum one of the few weak visual links in an otherwise beautifully
rendered fantasy film. It’s a shame, and might be the only flaw to be attributed
to the adaptation process.



The Two Towers is effective entertainment. Despite some minor plot changes
and unfaithful character interpretations, fans of the books will be thrilled;
one can safely assume that this was Jackson’s main goal. Those who enjoyed the
first film enough will enjoy this film enough, though they’re not likely to
buy the DVD box set unless there are children involved. Newcomers to the trilogy
run the risk of being completely lost. Those in the last camp should be prepared
to sit back and enjoy the fight scenes, as there’s little else on offer.

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