Czech unemployment lowest in EU

The country also had the highest employment rate for non-EU migrants

The Czech Republic had the lowest unemployment rate among the 28 European Union member states again in June, and has held this position the first six months of the year, as well as overall for 2017.

Unemployment in the EU in June 2018 was the lowest in a decade, according to Eurostat, the statistical office of the EU.

The Czech Republic also had the highest employment rate in the EU for non-EU migrants in 2017, and the second-highest self-employment rates for migrants born outside the EU.

In June 2018 the Czech Republic registered 2.4 percent unemployment and Germany was in second place with 3.4 percent.

The highest unemployment rates were in Greece at 20.2 percent (using April figures) and Spain at 15.2 percent.

The EU28 had an unemployment rate of 6.9 percent in June 2018, stable compared with May 2018 and down from 7.6 percent in June 2017. This is the lowest rate in the EU28 since May 2008.

Compared with a year ago, the unemployment rate fell across the EU. The largest decreases were in Cyprus, Portugal, Croatia, Estonia and Spain.

The euro area seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 8.3 percent in June 2018, also stable compared with May 2018 and down from 9.0 percent in June 2017.

This is the lowest rate in the euro area since December 2008.

Eurostat estimates that 17.105 million men and women in the EU28 were unemployed in June 2018. This includes 13.570 million in the euro area. 

In June 2018, some 3.415 million young persons under 25 were unemployed in the EU28, of whom 2.412 million were in the euro area.

In June 2018, the youth unemployment rate was 15.2 percent in the EU28 and 16.9 percent in the euro area, compared with 16.8 percent and 18.9 percent respectively in June 2017.

In June 2018, the lowest rates were observed in Malta, Germany, and the Netherlands, while the highest were in Greece, Spain and Italy.

For 2017 as a whole, the employment rate of persons in the EU aged 20-64 years ranged from 63.0 percent among migrants born outside the EU, through 73.0 percent among the native-born population, to 75.4 percent recorded for migrants born in a different EU member state.

For migrants born outside the EU, the employment rate was highest at 79.4 percent in the Czech Republic, followed by Romania at 76.3 percent, Portugal at 74.5 percent and Poland at 73.0 percent.

The United Kingdom reported the highest employment rate for migrants born in a different EU member state at 83.6 percent, closely followed by Portugal, Sweden and Estonia.

The highest employment rates for the native-born population were recorded in Sweden at 85.5 percent, Germany at 81.6 percent and the Netherlands at 80.5 percent. The Czech Republic was seventh at 78.5 percent.

In contrast, Greece recorded the lowest employment rates for the native-born population at 58.1 percent and for migrants born elsewhere in the EU at 56.1 percent, while Belgium had the lowest employment rate for migrants born outside the EU at 52.0 percent.

In 2017, some 30.4 million persons in the EU aged 20-64 were self-employed. Of these, 26.9 million were native-born, while 3.5 million were foreign-born. Of those, 2.2 million were migrants born outside the EU and 1.3 million were migrants born in a different EU member state.

By far the highest self-employment rates for migrants born outside the EU were recorded in Slovakia at 36.5 percent and the Czech Republic at 34.5 percent, followed after a gap by Hungary at 20.3 percent and Malta at 19.5 percent.

The lowest rates were recorded in Sweden at 8.1 percent, Estonia and Austria both at 8.0 percent and Cyprus at 7.9 percent.

For migrants born in a different EU member state, the highest self-employment rate in 2017 was recorded in Poland at 28.6 percent, followed by Malta at 20.3 percent and Latvia at 19.5 percent.

In contrast, the lowest self-employment rates for migrants born in a different EU member state were registered in Austria at 9.0 percent, Cyprus and Luxembourg both at 8.8 percent, with the lowest share in Hungary at 7.4 percent.

The rate of self-employment among native-born persons peaked in Greece at 31.0 percent, Italy at 22.1 percent and Poland at 17.4 percent.

By contrast, the lowest shares (below 10 percent) were recorded in Hungary at 9.7 percent, Germany at 9.4 percent, Sweden at 8.9 percent, Luxembourg at 8.7 percent and Denmark at 7.6 percent.

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